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Parents Accidentally Feed Toddler 200 Plastic Balls Instead of Candy

Parents Accidentally Feed Toddler 200 Plastic Balls Instead of Candy

The parents thought the tiny balls were colorful candies

Two parents accidentally mistook a package of water gel beads for candy and fed 280 of them to their toddler.

Parents often worry about their children mistaking inedible objects for candy and eating them, but recently two parents accidentally fed their daughter more than 200 tiny water-absorbing plastic balls, because they thought they were candy.

According to Shanghaiist, the balls are called “Water Babies,” and it’s easy to see how that particular mistake could happen. “Water Babies” is not a very descriptive name, and the cannister held brightly colored beads about the size of peppercorns, and they looked just like candy. In fact, it bears such a resemblance to candy that the mother of a 3-year-old girl in Jiansu, China, thought they were a specific type of colorful candy ball that her daughter liked, so when she saw them at the store, she bought them for a treat.

The little girl’s father gave her the tiny candies one at a time, and she had eaten about 280 of them before the mother decided to eat one, too. As soon as it was in her mouth, she realized it was definitely not food. In fact, it was a tiny water gel bead, which are little beads that soak up water and expand to about the size of marbles. They’re usually used for growing plants.

Once the parents realized what had happened, they panicked and took the little girl to the hospital. X-rays showed that she did have about 280 tiny beads in her stomach, but they had so far stayed peppercorn-sized. The doctors reportedly gave the little girl a laxative so she’d pass them before she had 300 marbles in her stomach, and no permanent damage was done.


Here's What Candy Came Out The Year You Were Born

Think you know what candy was the most popular the year you were born? Only one way to find out!

These little candies have a very colorful origin story. During the Spanish Civil war, Forest Mars Sr., son of the inventor of the Milky Way, witnessed soldiers eating small chocolate beads covered in hard sugar shells and was inspired. Chocolate sales typically dropped during the summer when temperatures rose and Mars was excited at the idea of inventing a product that wouldn't melt. He and Bruce Murrie, son of Hershey executive William Murrie, joined together to create the original M&M's (Mars + Murrie = M&M).

In 1941, Mars received a patent for his product and began mass-producing the little chocolate in Newark, NJ. They were originally sold in tubes and shelled in brown, red, orange, yellow, green, and violet coatings and only available to soldiers in the war. The candies were first stamped with a black "M" in 1950, which later changed to the white "M" we know and love today in 1954.

DOTS Gumdrops

Boasting itself as "America's favorite, #1-selling gumdrop brand" since its introduction in 1945, these chewy little guys have been beloved for over six decades. Tootsie makes over 4 billion DOTS each year and they still come in the same original flavors today as they did in the 1940s: cherry, strawberry, lemon, lime, and orange.

Bazooka Bubble Gum

Just looking at that picture brings the classic pink bubblegum taste to my mouth and has me humming, "Bazooka-zooka bubblegum. " Developed at the end of World War II in Brooklyn, New York, Bazooka Bubble Gum, with its Bazooka Joe comics inside, has been a classic chewing gum for decades.

While its partner candy bar Mounds has been around for almost a century, Almond Joy didn't join the game until a little later. While Mounds were already becoming a classic among Americans, the demand for milk chocolate was increasing steadily, leading to the development of the Almond Joy candy bar.

Junior Mints

With a creamy mint filling covered in a chocolate shell, Junior Mints were named after a popular Broadway show, Junior Miss, that was on stages in the 1940s. Today, over 15 million Junior Mints are produced each day in Cambridge, MA.


Here's What Candy Came Out The Year You Were Born

Think you know what candy was the most popular the year you were born? Only one way to find out!

These little candies have a very colorful origin story. During the Spanish Civil war, Forest Mars Sr., son of the inventor of the Milky Way, witnessed soldiers eating small chocolate beads covered in hard sugar shells and was inspired. Chocolate sales typically dropped during the summer when temperatures rose and Mars was excited at the idea of inventing a product that wouldn't melt. He and Bruce Murrie, son of Hershey executive William Murrie, joined together to create the original M&M's (Mars + Murrie = M&M).

In 1941, Mars received a patent for his product and began mass-producing the little chocolate in Newark, NJ. They were originally sold in tubes and shelled in brown, red, orange, yellow, green, and violet coatings and only available to soldiers in the war. The candies were first stamped with a black "M" in 1950, which later changed to the white "M" we know and love today in 1954.

DOTS Gumdrops

Boasting itself as "America's favorite, #1-selling gumdrop brand" since its introduction in 1945, these chewy little guys have been beloved for over six decades. Tootsie makes over 4 billion DOTS each year and they still come in the same original flavors today as they did in the 1940s: cherry, strawberry, lemon, lime, and orange.

Bazooka Bubble Gum

Just looking at that picture brings the classic pink bubblegum taste to my mouth and has me humming, "Bazooka-zooka bubblegum. " Developed at the end of World War II in Brooklyn, New York, Bazooka Bubble Gum, with its Bazooka Joe comics inside, has been a classic chewing gum for decades.

While its partner candy bar Mounds has been around for almost a century, Almond Joy didn't join the game until a little later. While Mounds were already becoming a classic among Americans, the demand for milk chocolate was increasing steadily, leading to the development of the Almond Joy candy bar.

Junior Mints

With a creamy mint filling covered in a chocolate shell, Junior Mints were named after a popular Broadway show, Junior Miss, that was on stages in the 1940s. Today, over 15 million Junior Mints are produced each day in Cambridge, MA.


Here's What Candy Came Out The Year You Were Born

Think you know what candy was the most popular the year you were born? Only one way to find out!

These little candies have a very colorful origin story. During the Spanish Civil war, Forest Mars Sr., son of the inventor of the Milky Way, witnessed soldiers eating small chocolate beads covered in hard sugar shells and was inspired. Chocolate sales typically dropped during the summer when temperatures rose and Mars was excited at the idea of inventing a product that wouldn't melt. He and Bruce Murrie, son of Hershey executive William Murrie, joined together to create the original M&M's (Mars + Murrie = M&M).

In 1941, Mars received a patent for his product and began mass-producing the little chocolate in Newark, NJ. They were originally sold in tubes and shelled in brown, red, orange, yellow, green, and violet coatings and only available to soldiers in the war. The candies were first stamped with a black "M" in 1950, which later changed to the white "M" we know and love today in 1954.

DOTS Gumdrops

Boasting itself as "America's favorite, #1-selling gumdrop brand" since its introduction in 1945, these chewy little guys have been beloved for over six decades. Tootsie makes over 4 billion DOTS each year and they still come in the same original flavors today as they did in the 1940s: cherry, strawberry, lemon, lime, and orange.

Bazooka Bubble Gum

Just looking at that picture brings the classic pink bubblegum taste to my mouth and has me humming, "Bazooka-zooka bubblegum. " Developed at the end of World War II in Brooklyn, New York, Bazooka Bubble Gum, with its Bazooka Joe comics inside, has been a classic chewing gum for decades.

While its partner candy bar Mounds has been around for almost a century, Almond Joy didn't join the game until a little later. While Mounds were already becoming a classic among Americans, the demand for milk chocolate was increasing steadily, leading to the development of the Almond Joy candy bar.

Junior Mints

With a creamy mint filling covered in a chocolate shell, Junior Mints were named after a popular Broadway show, Junior Miss, that was on stages in the 1940s. Today, over 15 million Junior Mints are produced each day in Cambridge, MA.


Here's What Candy Came Out The Year You Were Born

Think you know what candy was the most popular the year you were born? Only one way to find out!

These little candies have a very colorful origin story. During the Spanish Civil war, Forest Mars Sr., son of the inventor of the Milky Way, witnessed soldiers eating small chocolate beads covered in hard sugar shells and was inspired. Chocolate sales typically dropped during the summer when temperatures rose and Mars was excited at the idea of inventing a product that wouldn't melt. He and Bruce Murrie, son of Hershey executive William Murrie, joined together to create the original M&M's (Mars + Murrie = M&M).

In 1941, Mars received a patent for his product and began mass-producing the little chocolate in Newark, NJ. They were originally sold in tubes and shelled in brown, red, orange, yellow, green, and violet coatings and only available to soldiers in the war. The candies were first stamped with a black "M" in 1950, which later changed to the white "M" we know and love today in 1954.

DOTS Gumdrops

Boasting itself as "America's favorite, #1-selling gumdrop brand" since its introduction in 1945, these chewy little guys have been beloved for over six decades. Tootsie makes over 4 billion DOTS each year and they still come in the same original flavors today as they did in the 1940s: cherry, strawberry, lemon, lime, and orange.

Bazooka Bubble Gum

Just looking at that picture brings the classic pink bubblegum taste to my mouth and has me humming, "Bazooka-zooka bubblegum. " Developed at the end of World War II in Brooklyn, New York, Bazooka Bubble Gum, with its Bazooka Joe comics inside, has been a classic chewing gum for decades.

While its partner candy bar Mounds has been around for almost a century, Almond Joy didn't join the game until a little later. While Mounds were already becoming a classic among Americans, the demand for milk chocolate was increasing steadily, leading to the development of the Almond Joy candy bar.

Junior Mints

With a creamy mint filling covered in a chocolate shell, Junior Mints were named after a popular Broadway show, Junior Miss, that was on stages in the 1940s. Today, over 15 million Junior Mints are produced each day in Cambridge, MA.


Here's What Candy Came Out The Year You Were Born

Think you know what candy was the most popular the year you were born? Only one way to find out!

These little candies have a very colorful origin story. During the Spanish Civil war, Forest Mars Sr., son of the inventor of the Milky Way, witnessed soldiers eating small chocolate beads covered in hard sugar shells and was inspired. Chocolate sales typically dropped during the summer when temperatures rose and Mars was excited at the idea of inventing a product that wouldn't melt. He and Bruce Murrie, son of Hershey executive William Murrie, joined together to create the original M&M's (Mars + Murrie = M&M).

In 1941, Mars received a patent for his product and began mass-producing the little chocolate in Newark, NJ. They were originally sold in tubes and shelled in brown, red, orange, yellow, green, and violet coatings and only available to soldiers in the war. The candies were first stamped with a black "M" in 1950, which later changed to the white "M" we know and love today in 1954.

DOTS Gumdrops

Boasting itself as "America's favorite, #1-selling gumdrop brand" since its introduction in 1945, these chewy little guys have been beloved for over six decades. Tootsie makes over 4 billion DOTS each year and they still come in the same original flavors today as they did in the 1940s: cherry, strawberry, lemon, lime, and orange.

Bazooka Bubble Gum

Just looking at that picture brings the classic pink bubblegum taste to my mouth and has me humming, "Bazooka-zooka bubblegum. " Developed at the end of World War II in Brooklyn, New York, Bazooka Bubble Gum, with its Bazooka Joe comics inside, has been a classic chewing gum for decades.

While its partner candy bar Mounds has been around for almost a century, Almond Joy didn't join the game until a little later. While Mounds were already becoming a classic among Americans, the demand for milk chocolate was increasing steadily, leading to the development of the Almond Joy candy bar.

Junior Mints

With a creamy mint filling covered in a chocolate shell, Junior Mints were named after a popular Broadway show, Junior Miss, that was on stages in the 1940s. Today, over 15 million Junior Mints are produced each day in Cambridge, MA.


Here's What Candy Came Out The Year You Were Born

Think you know what candy was the most popular the year you were born? Only one way to find out!

These little candies have a very colorful origin story. During the Spanish Civil war, Forest Mars Sr., son of the inventor of the Milky Way, witnessed soldiers eating small chocolate beads covered in hard sugar shells and was inspired. Chocolate sales typically dropped during the summer when temperatures rose and Mars was excited at the idea of inventing a product that wouldn't melt. He and Bruce Murrie, son of Hershey executive William Murrie, joined together to create the original M&M's (Mars + Murrie = M&M).

In 1941, Mars received a patent for his product and began mass-producing the little chocolate in Newark, NJ. They were originally sold in tubes and shelled in brown, red, orange, yellow, green, and violet coatings and only available to soldiers in the war. The candies were first stamped with a black "M" in 1950, which later changed to the white "M" we know and love today in 1954.

DOTS Gumdrops

Boasting itself as "America's favorite, #1-selling gumdrop brand" since its introduction in 1945, these chewy little guys have been beloved for over six decades. Tootsie makes over 4 billion DOTS each year and they still come in the same original flavors today as they did in the 1940s: cherry, strawberry, lemon, lime, and orange.

Bazooka Bubble Gum

Just looking at that picture brings the classic pink bubblegum taste to my mouth and has me humming, "Bazooka-zooka bubblegum. " Developed at the end of World War II in Brooklyn, New York, Bazooka Bubble Gum, with its Bazooka Joe comics inside, has been a classic chewing gum for decades.

While its partner candy bar Mounds has been around for almost a century, Almond Joy didn't join the game until a little later. While Mounds were already becoming a classic among Americans, the demand for milk chocolate was increasing steadily, leading to the development of the Almond Joy candy bar.

Junior Mints

With a creamy mint filling covered in a chocolate shell, Junior Mints were named after a popular Broadway show, Junior Miss, that was on stages in the 1940s. Today, over 15 million Junior Mints are produced each day in Cambridge, MA.


Here's What Candy Came Out The Year You Were Born

Think you know what candy was the most popular the year you were born? Only one way to find out!

These little candies have a very colorful origin story. During the Spanish Civil war, Forest Mars Sr., son of the inventor of the Milky Way, witnessed soldiers eating small chocolate beads covered in hard sugar shells and was inspired. Chocolate sales typically dropped during the summer when temperatures rose and Mars was excited at the idea of inventing a product that wouldn't melt. He and Bruce Murrie, son of Hershey executive William Murrie, joined together to create the original M&M's (Mars + Murrie = M&M).

In 1941, Mars received a patent for his product and began mass-producing the little chocolate in Newark, NJ. They were originally sold in tubes and shelled in brown, red, orange, yellow, green, and violet coatings and only available to soldiers in the war. The candies were first stamped with a black "M" in 1950, which later changed to the white "M" we know and love today in 1954.

DOTS Gumdrops

Boasting itself as "America's favorite, #1-selling gumdrop brand" since its introduction in 1945, these chewy little guys have been beloved for over six decades. Tootsie makes over 4 billion DOTS each year and they still come in the same original flavors today as they did in the 1940s: cherry, strawberry, lemon, lime, and orange.

Bazooka Bubble Gum

Just looking at that picture brings the classic pink bubblegum taste to my mouth and has me humming, "Bazooka-zooka bubblegum. " Developed at the end of World War II in Brooklyn, New York, Bazooka Bubble Gum, with its Bazooka Joe comics inside, has been a classic chewing gum for decades.

While its partner candy bar Mounds has been around for almost a century, Almond Joy didn't join the game until a little later. While Mounds were already becoming a classic among Americans, the demand for milk chocolate was increasing steadily, leading to the development of the Almond Joy candy bar.

Junior Mints

With a creamy mint filling covered in a chocolate shell, Junior Mints were named after a popular Broadway show, Junior Miss, that was on stages in the 1940s. Today, over 15 million Junior Mints are produced each day in Cambridge, MA.


Here's What Candy Came Out The Year You Were Born

Think you know what candy was the most popular the year you were born? Only one way to find out!

These little candies have a very colorful origin story. During the Spanish Civil war, Forest Mars Sr., son of the inventor of the Milky Way, witnessed soldiers eating small chocolate beads covered in hard sugar shells and was inspired. Chocolate sales typically dropped during the summer when temperatures rose and Mars was excited at the idea of inventing a product that wouldn't melt. He and Bruce Murrie, son of Hershey executive William Murrie, joined together to create the original M&M's (Mars + Murrie = M&M).

In 1941, Mars received a patent for his product and began mass-producing the little chocolate in Newark, NJ. They were originally sold in tubes and shelled in brown, red, orange, yellow, green, and violet coatings and only available to soldiers in the war. The candies were first stamped with a black "M" in 1950, which later changed to the white "M" we know and love today in 1954.

DOTS Gumdrops

Boasting itself as "America's favorite, #1-selling gumdrop brand" since its introduction in 1945, these chewy little guys have been beloved for over six decades. Tootsie makes over 4 billion DOTS each year and they still come in the same original flavors today as they did in the 1940s: cherry, strawberry, lemon, lime, and orange.

Bazooka Bubble Gum

Just looking at that picture brings the classic pink bubblegum taste to my mouth and has me humming, "Bazooka-zooka bubblegum. " Developed at the end of World War II in Brooklyn, New York, Bazooka Bubble Gum, with its Bazooka Joe comics inside, has been a classic chewing gum for decades.

While its partner candy bar Mounds has been around for almost a century, Almond Joy didn't join the game until a little later. While Mounds were already becoming a classic among Americans, the demand for milk chocolate was increasing steadily, leading to the development of the Almond Joy candy bar.

Junior Mints

With a creamy mint filling covered in a chocolate shell, Junior Mints were named after a popular Broadway show, Junior Miss, that was on stages in the 1940s. Today, over 15 million Junior Mints are produced each day in Cambridge, MA.


Here's What Candy Came Out The Year You Were Born

Think you know what candy was the most popular the year you were born? Only one way to find out!

These little candies have a very colorful origin story. During the Spanish Civil war, Forest Mars Sr., son of the inventor of the Milky Way, witnessed soldiers eating small chocolate beads covered in hard sugar shells and was inspired. Chocolate sales typically dropped during the summer when temperatures rose and Mars was excited at the idea of inventing a product that wouldn't melt. He and Bruce Murrie, son of Hershey executive William Murrie, joined together to create the original M&M's (Mars + Murrie = M&M).

In 1941, Mars received a patent for his product and began mass-producing the little chocolate in Newark, NJ. They were originally sold in tubes and shelled in brown, red, orange, yellow, green, and violet coatings and only available to soldiers in the war. The candies were first stamped with a black "M" in 1950, which later changed to the white "M" we know and love today in 1954.

DOTS Gumdrops

Boasting itself as "America's favorite, #1-selling gumdrop brand" since its introduction in 1945, these chewy little guys have been beloved for over six decades. Tootsie makes over 4 billion DOTS each year and they still come in the same original flavors today as they did in the 1940s: cherry, strawberry, lemon, lime, and orange.

Bazooka Bubble Gum

Just looking at that picture brings the classic pink bubblegum taste to my mouth and has me humming, "Bazooka-zooka bubblegum. " Developed at the end of World War II in Brooklyn, New York, Bazooka Bubble Gum, with its Bazooka Joe comics inside, has been a classic chewing gum for decades.

While its partner candy bar Mounds has been around for almost a century, Almond Joy didn't join the game until a little later. While Mounds were already becoming a classic among Americans, the demand for milk chocolate was increasing steadily, leading to the development of the Almond Joy candy bar.

Junior Mints

With a creamy mint filling covered in a chocolate shell, Junior Mints were named after a popular Broadway show, Junior Miss, that was on stages in the 1940s. Today, over 15 million Junior Mints are produced each day in Cambridge, MA.


Here's What Candy Came Out The Year You Were Born

Think you know what candy was the most popular the year you were born? Only one way to find out!

These little candies have a very colorful origin story. During the Spanish Civil war, Forest Mars Sr., son of the inventor of the Milky Way, witnessed soldiers eating small chocolate beads covered in hard sugar shells and was inspired. Chocolate sales typically dropped during the summer when temperatures rose and Mars was excited at the idea of inventing a product that wouldn't melt. He and Bruce Murrie, son of Hershey executive William Murrie, joined together to create the original M&M's (Mars + Murrie = M&M).

In 1941, Mars received a patent for his product and began mass-producing the little chocolate in Newark, NJ. They were originally sold in tubes and shelled in brown, red, orange, yellow, green, and violet coatings and only available to soldiers in the war. The candies were first stamped with a black "M" in 1950, which later changed to the white "M" we know and love today in 1954.

DOTS Gumdrops

Boasting itself as "America's favorite, #1-selling gumdrop brand" since its introduction in 1945, these chewy little guys have been beloved for over six decades. Tootsie makes over 4 billion DOTS each year and they still come in the same original flavors today as they did in the 1940s: cherry, strawberry, lemon, lime, and orange.

Bazooka Bubble Gum

Just looking at that picture brings the classic pink bubblegum taste to my mouth and has me humming, "Bazooka-zooka bubblegum. " Developed at the end of World War II in Brooklyn, New York, Bazooka Bubble Gum, with its Bazooka Joe comics inside, has been a classic chewing gum for decades.

While its partner candy bar Mounds has been around for almost a century, Almond Joy didn't join the game until a little later. While Mounds were already becoming a classic among Americans, the demand for milk chocolate was increasing steadily, leading to the development of the Almond Joy candy bar.

Junior Mints

With a creamy mint filling covered in a chocolate shell, Junior Mints were named after a popular Broadway show, Junior Miss, that was on stages in the 1940s. Today, over 15 million Junior Mints are produced each day in Cambridge, MA.